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CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:45am EST
. this is his book, "oss in china prelude to cold war." professor, where are you from originally? >> i originally came from china. the city was the wartime capital of china. that's for all the major players in the book stay, and so since my childhood, i was intrigued by a lot of things. the oss was the wartime intelligence office. the reason why i couldn't write a book like this was because a late 1980s, bill casey who was the president of ronald reagan's cia director, he was also a history buff, decided to want to open up all the oss operation files. no one in the world had done it. you open up your own intelligence days of the entire operation file. that's amazing. so now it's at the national archives in college park, maryland. it's a gigantic record file. it has about 8000 feet of files. so i delved into this and i found some of the fascinating stuff. so i decided to write the book, and the book was first published in 1997 on the 50th anniversary of the cia. so it sold relatively well, and then 9/11 happened, and interesting intelligence organization, but then people were overwhelmi
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 4:15am EST
, china, egypt, venezuela and even a few more. but i'm looking out of the book and what i set out to do is look at the struggle between democrats and dictators. which you find this is a wonderful political science literature out there on the topic. but in fact, it's actually lived by people in the very concrete way on a day-to-day basis. just a couple hours before he came over here this morning, many people are profiled in russia were just arrested. this is a fluid stream of income late and i wanted to look at how these two sides are facing off against each other. one of the things i don't think we often realize is the battle between democracies and dictatorships going on today as opposed to the not so distant past is actually almost always die struggle between individuals. and so why did i choose the countries i chose? i chose them because these are some of the most sophisticated regimes. what you find as it's actually, i think you could guess this from 20 above and if you are in anyway following events. it's a very hard time to be a dictator. it's very difficult. this is not an easy g
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 12:00pm EST
-and-neck in manufacturing with china. now, that is a staggering statistic. we make 20% of the world's goods with about 10% of our economy. china makes about 20% of the world's goods with 40% of its economy. we are neck-and-neck as a manufacturer, and it's due to a six-time productivity advantage that we enjoy over china when it comes to manufacturing, and we even have a productivity advantage over countries like japan and germany, countries thought of as manufacturing leaders. i wondered, and i started asking myself, well, what is it that gives us this productivity advantage? what is it that gives american manufacturers this ability to compete? i wanted to go and talk to rail manufacturers because one of the things that when you're in washington and in bureaucracies, you know, you have a lot of people pontificating about the state of american manufacturing and what we need to do without actually engaging and talking to manufacturers, and, particularly, not talking to small and medium-sized manufacturers. the large manufacturers, the ceos, are often represented on policy think tanks, but the reality is al
CSPAN
Dec 26, 2012 12:45am EST
india and china to develop into a completely distinct world civilizations without having much to do with each other for long-term history. let's take that image that you offered of america, this amazingly simple geographic place with all of these natural harbors and rivers that run the right way but that was true for thousands of years and didn't leave to the development to rate civilization and european civilization and began to make powerful use of those the geographical advantages are obvious, so help us think about why it's geography that we should focus on as opposed to the cultural or civilization will aspect. >> that was due to the development of the failing chips which enable the croswell landed voyages, so that development of technology while it is short in distance it did not negate, it made it more important because it opened up a whole new geography and the world trade system cultural and economics flow from the geography because what is culture? it is the accumulated experience of a specific people on may specifically and skate over hundreds of thousands of years that l
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 3:05pm EST
relevant, and that's where we deal with the great communist power of the day, china. chambers -- this is a passage i like, chambers wrote, "what i had been fell from me like dirty rags. it was not communism, but the materialist modern mind, the shroud of which it spun about the spirit of man, paralyzing the instaipght for the soul of god denying the reality of the soul and birthright on the mystery on which mere knowledge falters and shatters at every step." we now watch the soulless cheese nigh communism party battle chinese christians, buddhists, and believe that if they can only offer a few more apartments or better factory jobs in port cities, that will offer the answer to chinese people's yearnings for freedom. in that sense, everything chambers wrote about communism and its failures is quite applicable, i think. the tougher question, or a tougher question, is the relevance of what he wrote to our struggle today with islamism. here, the other side relies on faith, and our side, especially in europe, seems to rely on materialism. this was a struggle of the human soul, cham
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 5:30pm EST
out of the way. it's laissez-faire capitalism. but china is a communist country but it's also a capital country, just a different definition of capitalism, and singapore, where there's a strong collaboration between the government and the market, you have a different form of capitalism. places like brazil and india where there's a big social agenda, you have a different form. anyone europe, southern europe, northern europe, different forms, but in northern europe, the informed capitalism, where the government believes in strong social safety net, believes in paying for health care, believes in playing a role in determining what businesses grow or fail, and they're creating more jobs than we are. so we have to be careful when we, as we sometimes do in the united states, get up on our high horse and say we understand capitalism. actually what's going on in the world is a competition between different versions, and if our version produces more inequality, produces less growth, it's -- is seen as less fair and others are seep as more fair and producing growth, who do you think is
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 12:30pm EST
wind and solar makes no sense. also five years ago we thought that china and india and other emerging economies might sign onto emissions reductions. and, therefore, that if we reduced e many uses -- emissions, perhaps global temperatures would be reduced. and i don't take a position on whether manmade emissions cause global warming or not, but if we are reducing our emissions and china and india which make up 37% of the world's population are not doing so, we're not going to have any effect on global temperatures. and in the first chapter of the book, i talk about geoengineering solutions that nobel prides-winning scientist paul krugman thinks can reduce global temperatures if we just do it on our own such as spraying clouds with water or painting roofs white to reflect the sun's rays. what we're doing with the $12 billion that we're spending on alternative energy is pushing people into cars they don't want to buy, we're raising electricity costs, we are pushing -- we are getting rid of incandescent lightbulbs in favor of flour rest sent lightbulbs. and the cost of this falls disprop
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 2:30pm EST
30 million people out of poverty. when china joined they brought about 300 million people out poverty. that's been a big story. chinese savings in the world financial market were a part what drove the most recent about new welt wealth in the world. as brilliant a man as allen green span was unable to grasp the reality of our historical moment. it was in part due to that failure that somatic errorrers were made that lead to the meltdown in-housing crisis. in inadequate response, policy to what was really a change in financial market due to growth elsewhere in the world. in the next twenty to thirty years, 3 billion people are joining the global economy. it's going to be a transformation ten times what we have seen which was ten times what happened in japan. now if 3 billion people are suddenly given cognitive freedom, suddenly not thinking just moment to moment, day-to-day, in a existence but are creators, are collaborators, are new contributors, human beings are not just consumers. they are producers. and that's what this is about. it's the possibility that are created when that happe
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 12:15am EST
, laizzez-faire capitalism, milton friedman capitalism but other places, china is a communist country but it is also a capitalist country, just a different definition of capitalism. in places like singapore where there are small countries where there is a strong collaboration between the government and the market, a different form of capitalism. places like brazil and india where there's a big social agenda because they are developing. in southern europe, northern europe or different forms, in northern europe, the government believes in a strong social safety nets, believe in paying for health care, believe in playing a role in determining what businesses succeed or fail and yet those governments have budgets that are balanced and growing faster than we are and creating more jobs than we are. we have to be a little bit careful when we as we sometimes do in the united states that are high horse and say we understand capitalism, actually what is going on in the world is a competition between different versions and if our version produces more in the quality and less growth is seen as le
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 2:45pm EST
.s. engineer who went to china and saw them building a dam. and china's o so interested in having jobs and job creation. and the u.s. engineer goes to china, and he sees them building a dam, and they're all using shovels. and the engineer asks the chinese engineer, why are they using shovels? why don't you have them use modern equipment? we're trying to create jobs. and so the british -- engineer says why don't you give them spoons? [laughter] all jobs are not the same. the idea that we somehow reduce spending or even if we reduce the growth of government spending which would be an important first step does not mean we're going to see retardation in growth levels. those people who actually do capital investment. so i've been arguing as kevin said on entitlement reform. the federal government spent $3.5 trillion last year. of that about 1.5 was social security, medicare and medicaid. three big government expenditure programs are about 45% of government expenditures. those are growing. in 2010 medicare and medicaid combined spent more than social security. social security is a $750 billion progr
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 10:00pm EST
was the source of the of raw material for his silk works? >> it was raw silk from china. it was rob. it came from china and ultimately he would trade and imports from japan. raw silk is like he imported and converted into thread and that was turned into fabric. >> what does it look like? >> here is a silkworm cocoon. the moth is still inside. the manufacturing of silk is very complicated and the extraordinary process. this one a cocoon is wound was one strand of silk half a mile long but it is so fine it is barely perceptible and nowhere near enough shape to be used as the red. in a nutshell, fink of a pyramid and silk cocoons at the bottom the filaments are wound together into a layer and then another layer until you have one thread made of various silk filaments. it is silk that has been unwound from the cocoon and joined together part way up the pyramid that arrives in states in bundles they were called books. >> did they ship textile as well? >> yes. he began to manufacture silk threadfin in holyoke he would weave the thread into fabrics that enabled him to succeed because when he rebuilt the
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 3:30pm EST
said. his point was that the transformation of the world economy lifts four people in china and india out of poverty and into the middle class, and meanwhile one american drops out of the middle class, that's not such a bad trade, right? like four to one. i spoke to a cfo of a u.s. technology company, and this was like a really, a person who was really sort of charming and lovely life story. he was taiwanese-born, his parents were immigrants, and his parents told him and his brother when they immigrated that they were temporarily poor. i love that, you know, imagine that. we're going to be temporarily poor. and sure enough, he and his brother just like complete rock stars, both of them went to stuyvesant in new york. they were such avid members of the math club that now they fund it. one brother is -- yeah, exactly. one is in silicon valley, the other is derivatives on wall street. this brother, the cfo, his parents were really angry at him because he dropped out of a ph.d. program at stanford having gone to harvard to start becoming a plutocrat. so very hard working guy, very smart,
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:30pm EST
don't believe that people in pakistan or china need to hear this because the seat. even in pakistan has really struggled with so much potential. i think it is the next greatest store, the next global opportunity and the resources we wouldn't tell people that because they would be investing heavily and the dividends with other people but it's just on the cusp of happening. really exciting. and so, it's frequent in this country. and it's for anybody that believes there's a possibly in the future they are wondering why it isn't happening more quickly. >> so why are china, india, pakistan -- why are they where they are economically if they are on the cusp? what is going not right in those countries that's growing right here in the united states? >> pakistan doesn't have the momentum so they are in a different category. >> brazil, take brazil. >> again, the thing that constrains growth in every country and the symbol -- which i do and i go to places like the world bank and if i am invited to share my thoughts with folks that work on policy issues mayor and the same thing in the united st
CSPAN
Dec 8, 2012 9:00pm EST
for french in to china. where they claimed to encounter racism on parallel. they routinely stayed at branches of the ymca, the equivalent for the grown men of boy scouts and cheered on by enclaves of indians who instituted the south asian over most of the globe. a consequence empire and kind of -- a different and similar manifestation of internationalism supported them in this clutch of circumnavigators. the international and support him on the later surfaced tour of the world. he came from a privileged russian family. that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that revolution. as a white russian stranded stranded in china he was a man without a country. so destitute he made his way to shanghai, overhand and a mix of men and women in cast off slothing. he obtained a passport. a document that the league of nations had begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 1922, a first step in the development of international refugee law and policy. the international office of you are fuji in 1938. he yearned to rally members of the non-- a
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 12:30pm EST
and where is china all of this? >> so there are several different pieces. one of them going back to the economy, we used to have much higher practices than we do now. how were we able to have full employment on that? we did not have the system of the budget deficits what makes it so much harder and just to sort of duty had enough, it is the persistence of trade deficit least not have one and now we do and that is a big drag on the economy. which hasn't been better actually the trade deficit is actually significantly down but not all. we have had some that have become more competitive that is the front on which we need to work. the political debate hasn't kept up with the reality it's no longer the quarter of that anymore. it's the broadest of countries some that need to be worked on and the next president isn't just china bashing but what do we need to do have a world that is everybody trying to run a trade surplus which the government believes it is possible. [laughter] >> then there is this issue of trade and income inequality. and there's a similar level that presumably had re
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00pm EST
is to be pushed off and if you do you push it puts a to china who doesn't care. yeah it's much worse. at the bottom line is america is actually good about mining in terms of world standards we have the highest standards really of safety the you are talking about huge amounts of toxic metals that they admittedly don't know how to control. it is in the they don't want to be and i do not think they are evil by nature they just don't know how to do at. in arizona may be one person dies a year. that's ridiculous. that's nothing. more people die at barnes and noble or something. so, i'm not worried about like to see factor. in other countries it is much higher. they don't have the standards and basic the mining companies are like any corporation. whatever the rules are in that country they are going to go to the lowest common denominator if they can get away with it the well. the company that owns the mine in my town is a huge offender around the world. they play nice here they are not very nice around the world. which is what i think that you were asking. i talked to my executives that ba
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 1:30am EST
, several more than once. she accompanied her husband on the groundbreaking trip to china and set new precedence herself by traveling as an official representative united states to the migration of president william tolbert of liberia in 1972 and repeating the task in 1974 by attending the swearing-in ceremony of her a nest of gazelle. wherever she went she espoused the same practice utilized during her travels in 1950's. she strove to make as many strands -- france is possible for herself in the country. while her desire to make friends everywhere might've had clinical consequences it arose from a sincere desire to look beyond the dignitaries to the people of the countries he visited. in part because of a connection with our own roots. she never forgot who she was or where she came from. she was the daughter of a truck farmer who had supported herself since she was a teenager. at one point during her husbands administration she told a childhood friend that even though she occasionally felt inadequate to the task that quote she was only -- from artesia, the people she met were so grac
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 1:00pm EST
roughly 40 million people out of poverty. when china joined the global economy and so for the firm bought about 300 million out of poverty pity that's a big story. chinese savings in the world financial markets are a big part of what drove the most recent economic bubble because even alan greenspan couldn't figure it out. he wasn't looking at the reality of the moment. he called this the conundrum, he went back to it when he wrote his book. as brilliant a man as alan greenspan was, he was unable to grasp the reality of our historical moment. and it was in part to deutsch that failure, the systematic errors to the housing markets. and the policy was a change in the financial markets in growth elsewhere in the world. well in the next 20 to 30 years, 3 million people were joining the global economy. it's going to be a transformation ten times what we have seen from the china exchange which is ten times what would happen in japan. now if 3 billion people are suddenly given cognitive freedom, suddenly not thinking just a moment to moment and day to day in the subsistence existence but the crea
CSPAN
Dec 10, 2012 6:30am EST
fannie and freddie or not? we can hardly tell china to go jump in the south china sea because they were our biggest creditors. so by 2008 the game was over. treasury had to come in and provide huge infusions of money. so far this has cost about $142 billion. fannie and freddie now were under the thumb of the regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow, and he promised to shrink them gradually and to reduce the independence of the housing market on them gradually. but meanwhile, we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most home mortgages. fannie and freddie and fha in recent years have accounted for around 90% of new u.s. homeland. eventually congress will have to make have to make fundamental decisions about what kind of mortgage market will we have. should we go back to trusting the free market, or shall we have some kind of government mechanism in place to ensure that to mortgages can always be a portable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggest that when it comes to housing, congress will have a hard time trusting the market. tha
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 3:00pm EST
? >> yes. the source for his mill was raw silk that came from china. >> in thread form? >> no, it was raw silk. so, and it came from china, and ultimately he began to also trade with japan and import from japan. the raw silk was what he imported, and then he converted it into thread and then wove that into fabric. >> what does raw silk look like? >> well, here is a silkworm cocoon. and you can come up afterwards and shake it, the moth is still inside of it. and the manufacturing of silk is a very complicated and extraordinary process. and this one can cocoon is wound with one strand of silk that is about a half a mile long. but it's so fine as to be barely perceptible and is nowhere near in any shape to be used as thread. so what happens is, in a nutshell, if you think of a pyramid and you think of a whole bunch of zell cocoons at the bottom, various cosoons, the fill laments, are wound together in another layer, and those are wound together, and ultimately you get to one, you have one thread that is made of various silk fill filaments. so the raw silk has been unwound from the cocoon and
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 5:00pm EST
years, there has been a lot more further people's republic of china and the string of pearls strategy into the indian ocean. pakistan is some most important city you have never heard of because the chinese got a post there to listen to ships going in and out of the straight of hormuz and they also have resource relationships with iran and sudan. and as i think you all know, records of those countries and how they tend to make war on their neighbors and also we have the china daily newspaper. its total propagandpropagand a for the peoples of china and i'm wondering, i think the chinese sold the ideas of -- which you might've studied at the naval academy but i'm wondering, in the next few years, with their lower number of ships and sequestration threat over us and the current expansion of chinese power, how would you best manage our military resources around the world? [laughter] >> thank you for the softball question. [laughter] admiral mullen when he was at her graduation as chief of naval operations come he told us to speak truth to power. as a junior officer, not to follow unethical
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 2:00pm EST
? because hardly tell china to jump into the south china sea because they were our biggest creditors. by mid 2008 the game was over. the treasury had to coming and provide huge infusions of money. so far this cost $142 billion. fannie and freddie were under the thumb of their regulator, edward demarco, a no-nonsense fellow who promise to shrink gradually and reduce the independence of the housing market gradually. meanwhile we are still relying on fannie and freddie to provide funding for most mortgages. annie, freddie and the f h a have accounted for 90% of u.s. home loans. eventually congress will make a fundamental decision about what kind of mortgage market we will have. it will go back to trusting the free market or have some kind of government mechanism in place to insure that home mortgages can always be affordable? i submit that the historical record of the past 70 years suggests when a comes to housing congress will have a hard time trusting the market. thank you. [applause] >> great comments. this brings us to our discussions of whom the first will be tom who has been in the mortga
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 10:00am EST
approach to this, and governor romney's statement labeling china a currency manipulator on day 1 suggests taking a tougher alignment with china may be an issue, is worth pursuing. we will see not an enormous change but probably a check up in preparation and confrontation, oversight. >> anyone else? >> i suspect on detention policy we won't see a lot of change. we did not see a lot of change from the bush and administration to the obama administration, the obama administration argued that the protection should not extend to the circuits, congress wanted to keep the courts out more than they have when they passed the military detention acts and everything else in 2006 and tried to correct for what they saw as the court trying to extend jurisdiction, they have established a line, i do not see they can't push back against that line and the battle lines that performed at this point. >> i basically agree with greg the obama administration continued, without any change whatsoever. and on the ground, on the question, with new detainee's, the legacy cases are not going anywhere. governor romney wo
CSPAN
Dec 29, 2012 10:30am EST
the factory and move to china? i would guess probably non. close to zero. what of thought, that the workers who had to live with a factory that closes, live in a community that will be affected by factories the close, and workers themselves make the decision. here is another one. for chris decide what to do with the profits, here's an interesting thing we expect. over the last 30 years with boards of directors, we have noticed something i am sure you have all noticed, the boards of directors decided to use the profits they were earning to give enormous increases in the salaries to top executives. we are famous in america for that. thee aratio of one executive ge to an average worker is 300 to 40s all other countries. so we have been in a major part of the ineq0 lity that i talked about before that has grown up in 30 years comes out of the decisions made in the boardroom with the boards of directors and mothor shareholders about the profits. if the workers themseffeces distributed the profits collectively, would they give poor people $4s every body else says not enough? unlikely. the biggest
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 9:30am EST
, saudi arabia actors. is really also about china and russia on the one hand, and the united states and europe on the other. so we have three levels of stalemate. local, regional and international, simply because there's so much at stake. so a country like syria, or a regime like syria for the past 40 years have had these calculations in mind. so this is not to excuse the regime whatsoever. this is to understand, the outcomes of what we have been witnessing for the past several decades involve these kind of calculations that many of us don't take into account. >> and we've been talking with bassam haddad, "business networks in shyria: the political economy of authoritarian resilience" is the name of this book. it's published by stanford. professor haddad is also head of the middle eastern studies program here at george mason university. this is a booktv on c-span2. >> tell us what you think about our program this weekend. you can tweet us at booktv, comment on our facebook wall, or send us an e-mail. tv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> with just days left in this mont
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 1:15pm EST
this china has in bubble that exploded so painfully. so i think the regulators to certainly share the burden of blame along with the financial restitutions themselves. >> host: "bailout" by neil barofsky is a best-seller. the first call is patricia in cottonwood, california. patricia, you're on book tv. go ahead with your question or comment for neil barofsky. >> caller: yes. hi. i just wanted thank you for writing this book because has opened my eyes to exactly what happened. i remember when they were voting on this, and i was kind of screening of the tv, please don't do this. your book has made it able for me to understand how on-line level, i guess, i could say, exactly what happened, and i just thank you so much for writing this book. al was wondering if you are going to write any other books about the stimulus or anything else, you know, these big huge things that they are passing. there is anything like the ordinarily person can do to get there voice heard. >> guest: first of all, thank you. it feels great, you know, when writing a book like this. it is a challenge writing about the ba
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 2:00pm EST
government and it stunned official washington. in china mao tse tung's people's liberation army and shanghai check's nationalist forces on the run the following year, the communists would assume command of the world's most populous nation. 1950 was a particularly eventful year. in january scientists called fuchs surrendered to british authorities admitting he was a nuclear spy the same month a halter hiss was convicted of perjury. the statute of limitations on espionage have inspired and he was sent to jail. in may, the fbi arrested harry gold who identified julius and ethel rosenberg as conspirators in a plot to give nuclear secrets to moscow. in june, north korea invaded south korea and presented the u.s. with a choice, turn back the invasion or allow the communists to secure a key piece on the chessboard of asia. in 1952 whitaker chambers published "witness". which argued that the united states faced a transcendent, not a transitory crisis, was not one of politics or economics but of faith, and secular liberalism, a watered-down version, no wonder the liberals have never forgiven chambers
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 6:00pm EST
products and american values. china, in ti ha particular, hasn aggressive strategy to help its companies invest in africa, leaving a trouble footprint across the continent of its environmental, and governance and values standards. the loss to american workers and american influence on the continent is enormous and inexcusable. that's why we introduced this bill, to make sure senior administration official brings desperately needed coordination and leadership to the u.s. export strategies in africa. it also makes sure that various agencies, such as the department of commerce, the export-import bank, the department of state and others are fully engaged in helping foster u.s. investment in africa. for months, we've been working with the various committees of the house and senate on this effort. i want to notably thank senator john kerry of massachusetts and senator dick lugar of indiana for seeing the unanimous -- the unanimous support through the foreign relations subcommittee was secured, as well as the banking and finance committees for their help in allowing us to go forward. the bill c
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 7:00pm EST
in china where they claim to encounter racism unparalleled in any part of the world they had gone to. irritatingly stayed in branches of the ymca, the equivalent for grown men of the boy scouts and they were cheered on by enclaves of indians and especially -- the constant stated the dias pro-for the most of the globe remarkably a consequence of empire and counterweights to it. a different diaspora and yet similar manifestation of the internationalism supported -- in this clutch of circumnavigate errors, this international on his slightly later surface to her of the world. he came from a privileged russian family but that was of no help when he found himself on the losing side in the russian civil war during that country's revolution. as a white russian stranded in china the man without a country so destitute that he made his way to shanghai overland and a mix of men's and women's clothing. in shanghai he obtained passports, documents of the league of nations have begun to issue to stateless refugees initially russians in 1922. a first step in the development of international refugee
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 9:00pm EST
to go into a press conference in a crisis with red china, and aids warned him to be careful. don't worry, said, ike, i'll confuse them, and he did. he had bad syntax, but i noticed in the private letters and memos were clear as a bell. he was smiling congenial, but also tough. his vice president, richard nixon wrote that ike was, quote, a deviant man, devious in the best sense of the word, added nixon. i was talking to eisenhower's son, john, he said, about the apparent even balance about the congenial ike and cold-blooded ike. he said, make that 75% cold-blooded. when ike was elected president, the military, top brass, hopeful the formal general would spend more on weapons and the military: in fact, ike reduced military spending. he was always weary of the military hyping the needs for weapons and men. when he saw the pentagon's estimate, he wrote in the margin, i doubt it, it took us three months just to take sicily. when the spending requests came in, he said, i know the boys at the pentagon. he believed real national security was from a sound economy. he was a deficit hawk, boy, we c
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 11:00am EST
conference during a crisis with red china, and his aides were warning him to be careful about what he said. don't worry, i'll just confuse them. he did. ike often have bad syntax. i noticed in his private letters and memos were clear as a bell. ike was smiling, congenial but also tough. as vice president richard nixon once wrote that he was a more complex and devious man than people realized. quote i'm and devious in the vastness of the word, added nixon. i was talking to eisenhower's son, john, his dad, about the apparent balance between the sunny congenial ike and the cold-bloocold-bloo ded ike. john smiled for a moment and said make that a 75% cold-blooded. when ike was elected president, military, the top brass were hopeful that the former general could be counted on to spend more on weapons and the military. in fact, ike reduce military spending. he was always wary of the military heightening and the needs for weapon and mean. when he saw the pentagon estimate that the red army could overrun europe in two weeks, he wrote in the margin, i doubt. it took us three months just to take thi
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:00am EST
wood. we have breakfast here early. she said the teamsters at first way. she gave me a china bowl filled with warm porridge with a lump of homemade blackberry jam, my favorite in the middle of the porridge and she poured cream on it. i switched it with my spin before it it it, swirling into a purple mass and was his happiest i've ever ever been about anything. it tasted perfect. a stocky woman came in. her red brown hair was streaked with gray and cut short. she had apple cheeks, dark green skirt that went to her knees and wellington boots. she said this must be the boy from the top of the lane. it would be fired at the meeting tease him. she felt a copper kettle and put the kettle on to the flame and took down the pipe shaped blanks from a cupboard and hesitated, looking at the woman. the woman said your rights, six. the doctor will be there too. and the woman pursed her lips and made a noise. they may still know she said. he wrote it so carefully two, folded in his pocket and they haven't looked there yet. what does it say? read it yourself with the woman. i thought she was let
CSPAN
Dec 25, 2012 8:45pm EST
was president, the republicans mainly were running the congress when we had things like nafta, china most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization, all of these trade deals that people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case the jobs left. >> many publications are putting together their year-end list of notable books. book tv will feature several of the books focusing on the non-fiction selections. these titles were included in foreign policy magazines must read books to give in breakout nations in pursuit of the next economic miracles on the set is another author we want to introduce you to a and this is brian. here is his book castor's secrets the cia and the intelligence machine. if you could start by giving us your background, particularly your cia background. >> i worked at the national intelligence council in washington for about 45 years. i ultimately became the national intelligence officer for latin america which is a tree or four-star military equivalent but it's a pretty substantial position and i had the responsibility for all
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 12:00pm EST
around the world, china is a huge creditor. we owe them over a trillion, we'll japan over a trillion. governments are holding on to this debt. you know, there is a story. i forget where it was run that mentioned from the peak of the housing double until now they said the average american household net worth was down about 40%. it's actually down a lot more than that when you factor in each share of the debt that has been accumulated in their name by the federal government. so americans are basically already broke. that's why we have to just admit that we are insolvent because the american families cannot repay the money that's been borrowed in their name. so we admit that we are insolvent. greece imposed a hair cut at 50% of the bondholders. we tell people that have one-year treasury bills we can't pay you back in a year. you have to extend the maturity beebee ten years. america has to tell people who are collecting social security right now or who are expecting to collect it they aren't going to get as much money as they were promised. we have to cut the pensions of the retired amid
CSPAN
Dec 17, 2012 1:25am EST
to buy back american from china. america, it's probably very clear to you right now your shortest path to true democracy is due north. when you go into that polling station this year, don't just check the box for most charming millionaire. consider a country you truly deserve, canada, and together, we can make a new america, but better. thank you. [applause] >> thank you. [applause] >> thank you. >> awesome. >> handsome man. he's the average canadian. they did a computer photo thing and averaged all the canadians together, and this is the guy we got. >> there's hairy women in canada. >> i'll read a standard mortality table -- short section, section 3.2. this is about the citizens united decision. do i have to explain that to anybody? okay, good. stop putting politicians on layaway, and start buying them out right at the bed, bath, and beyond integrity. a quick fact before i introduce the chapter. before i get going, thank you, c-span for coming out and covering this. you guys are awesome. [applause] more programming like this, a little less council on foreign relations and bull shit. [
CSPAN
Dec 30, 2012 11:15pm EST
rights and obligations. what rights does an american have on north korea, iran, china, or for that matter indonesia and what rights does an american jew, gay or woman in chile and syria? what obligations we have to the french nation to suggest we are citizens of the world destroys our understanding of the term and weakens us at the performance of the duties of the citizen. one might say that the american power was the 1969 moon landing, and since then, we'll be successful the empire in history according to the greatest access to prosperity, happiness and public life and history have been on the decline. this decline has given as inevitable. nothing lasts forever. this period of diminishing american hegemony, however, may be one of calfee age. we are the owners of the country and its board of directors, and we may find the strength to reasonably consider the options open to us in this confusing time, none of them is perfect. and this is a time we must make a moral choice which is to say a choice between the two flawed or bad alternatives. if we do not choose, the choice will be made for us
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 2:00pm EST
in the last couple years the rise of state capitalism in china and russia and a number other countries. so the question becomes, how on this global environment would be state capitalism vigorously against each other for resources and for market and cheap labor. how does one bring standards within that timeframe we talked about to the breaks. china is really behaving internationally no different than the united states, great britain behave in prior centuries. as you say, we are running out of time and running out of resources. the kind of renewal, political renewal were talking about really has to be global in order for this to work because the u.s. based corporations doesn't fall on the global economy. so i'm imagining, is this overthrowing the wto and allowing the environmental sky rise are things that produce products for national legislation, winding operations operations -- what is a delicate a handle on that? [inaudible] >> i have so many peered to her three years ago paul kildee wrote a book, arguing that exactly the kind of results in terms of movement will not happen in this countr
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 10:30am EST
at very low interest rates. substitute the words the united states and greece, and china to germany and you have a world scale, the problem in the united states. the problem in the whole world. but let me just, following those comments, you know, you've got a single moment. [inaudible] decided to they want more unity or less. because the euro cannot survive unless they have more sense of some kind of central control. more sense of discipline before the crisis. which means some kind of limits on fiscal policy, but one thing, but it goes on fiscal policy. spain had a pretty good fiscal policy. they kept borrowing money to build houses. so we've got to have some kind of oversight of economic policy as part of the price of being in the union. they wanted -- [inaudible] monetary union without the economic union. doesn't work. so the proposals are out there, and i think they basically want to move towards more economic union. a lot of debate, a lot of reluctance. i think they're going to do in the end but this is something you can do overnight. but the fact they're willing to look at is a
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 3:00pm EST
on china, the middle east and most recently the excellent new book, "fortress israel," which is a really excellent account of the last several decades of the kind of israeli national security establishment and, obviously, of considerable interest right now given the recent events in gaza. in addition to his work as an author, patrick has had a distinguished career at "the new york times" where he was chief correspondent. he was also baghdad bureau chief, london bureau chief, beijing bureau chief, moscow bureau chief, the list goes on and on. and so patrick is going to talk about the big themes of his book for around 20, 25 minutes, and then i'll ask him one or two questions and then open up to you, the audience, for questions. and since c-span is covering, bear in mind that you should wait for a mic and identify yourself and ask a question, not make a statement. thank you. >> thanks, pete. thanks very much for that introduction. i'm very grateful to the new america foundation to, for organizing this event and for all of you coming out on this blustery morning. "fortress israel" is my sec
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 10:00am EST
and china see their emission levels rise to the levels of the united states, global carbon levels go up 30 %. that's a huge difference. and whether or not you believe in global warming or you're just worried about the price of gas at the pump, we all have a lot to gain by china and india building up rather than out. and i think the most important thing for america to do in order to encourage that to happen is get its own urban policies in order, and that means stop treating our cities as if they are the ugly stepchildren of america and recognize them for the intellectual heart lambed, the cultural heartland of this country. and to me that means rethinking policies that act as if the american dream can only mean being a homeowner in the suburbs. it means rethinking policies that pay for highways with general tax revenues, focusing above all on our city schools which are such critical ingredients for urban success and such a critical problem which despite enormously hard work by people like mayor menino, like the city council, like leaders throughout this country are still so far from what t
CSPAN
Dec 16, 2012 2:00pm EST
from the ship to power in the united states and the west, to china and east. the powers of globalization in the digital era, how to do with the 1.6 billion muslims in the world, threats of iranian nuclear power. and i also look at internal threats. low birthrates, a simulation and again whether we can in effect succeed at a time when we are more successful than ever being integrated in our society. it's a new phenomenon and that's really what i wanted to write the book. i also write about that from an israeli is. i've been to israel maybe 40 times. three times this year alone during the carter and clinton administrations is deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel, but i'll say right from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, who has spent many, many years in time in israel. so it's a unique give looking from the outside in and the inside out. >> israel was one of the few foreign policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying you won't see many some night. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it's a r
CSPAN
Dec 22, 2012 2:00pm EST
. the republicans mainly were running congress when we had things like nafta, china most favored nation status, the wto, the world trade organization. all of these trade deals that people claimed were going to us bring jobs to the united states, and in every case the jobs left. >> with just days left in 2012, many publications are putting together their year-in list of notable books. book tv will feature several lists focusing on nonfiction selections. these titles were included in the best nonfiction 2012 list. in haiti, the aftershock of history, history professor at duke university examines the history of haiti. the ceo and editor in chief of salon presents the history of san francisco on the 1970's and season of the witch, enchantment, terror, and deliverance in the city of love. in a quiet, the power of introverts, susan kane examines the benefits of an introverted personality. looking at 1862, the second year of the civil war in the actions of abraham lincoln in rise to greatness, abraham lincoln's most perilous year. watch for this book as it is featured in the coming days. and in full
CSPAN
Dec 23, 2012 7:15pm EST
imported china, next to an essay about political issues. they could get personal. they go nasty back and forth. it was important back then. >> also poetry, nasty gossip [n][laughter] n]. >> some of these exchanges are reminiscent with on-line exchanges anonymous swiping at each other than the opposing newspaper. it always strikes me these days we think it is the anonymity people spew out the fact the answers because they're not thinking but then they had three days to think they knew who was in a still decided so i will talk about his illegitimate child [laughter][n. >> speenine what would be the most prized possession regardless of any fee paid? what you hope to acquire? what don't you have it in your collection? >> newspapers range in value with condition, a timeliness of the milestone whether american or british a variety of factors that range from tens of dollars to tens of thousands. the most coveted to many of those objectives, was the first printing of the american it declaration of independence from the pennsylvania evening post. 1776. it is very desirable. >> do you have it?
CSPAN
Dec 24, 2012 6:00pm EST
the united states and the west to china and the east, the powers of globalization of the digital era about how to deal with the 1.6 million muslims in the world come across to the iranian nuclear power. and i also like an internal press, low birthrates, assimilation and whether we can in effect succeeded at a time that we are more successful than matter and integrated into a society. it is a new phenomenon and that's why wanted to write the book. i else to write about that from israeli did. i think israel may be 40 times. three times this year alone during the carter and clinton administration is deeply involved in policies between the u.s. and israel. iran from the perspective of someone who has relatives in israel, has spent many, many years in israel. so if a unit perspective looking from the outside in and the inside out. >> ambassador eizenstat come israel is one of the few foreign-policy issues in the 2012 campaign. mitt romney saying he a sinuous anti-semite between the u.s. and israel. is the u.s. relationship and vice versa a healthy relationship? >> it is a remarkable relationshi
CSPAN
Dec 31, 2012 3:30pm EST
to keep avenues of adoption open for children from russia, from china, from romania, etc. people may be wondering, senator, you're so bold about speaking about this, do children from america, are children from america adopted overseas? the answer is yes. not many, but under the international treaties of the rights of the child to a family, we need to be open to have american children if they can't find an adoptive home here, to be able to go to other countries. but the most important thing is to know that americans step up every day to adopt american children, both infants, teenagers, and even i've known of adoptions of children that were 22 and 23 years old. when are you ever too old to need a mother and a father? but what the action that the russian duma has taken is -- it's a travesty and it's incomprehensible that any government could would take their anger out on another another country against the children of their own country. we hope they will reconsider. we hope the people of russia will rise up and tell their government absolutely not, take your anger out in another way, no
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 3:00pm EST
's not been in a place like pakistan or in egypt. i didn't get to china or anything. it's a totally different story. ting gets to the point. philadelphia, -- philip auerswald what do you teach? >> i teach economics and social entrepreneurship. i'm a believer in the entrepreneurship as a transformative force in society. it is, of course, thinking about how to address public challenges in an entrepreneur manner. potentially in new life pathway to make the most of that. .. there are many people who work on this topic who have helped move forward on the agenda but louise is one of the man deserves a lot of credit. >> we have been talking with philip auerswald, "the coming prosperity," how entrepreneurs are transforming the global economy. his most recent book. booktv of location at george mason university. >> tell us what you think of our programming this weekend. you can freeze us at booktv, comment on our facebook call or send us an e-mail, booktv, nonfiction books every weekend on c-span2. >> at the end of world war ii we had twelve million men under arms. we have 2,000 flag officers and gener
CSPAN
Dec 1, 2012 8:15pm EST
is an america needs offshoring. we have to offshore barack obama. he has to go. send him to china. >> first of all, what is . >> a vegas odds makers is someone who predistincts the winner of a sporting event. it was a natural outgrowth for me. to predicting the winner of political elections. and i think it was 2004, news max, the conservative website said out of all the odds makers and pollsters in america the one who got the most accurate prediction was wayne root. i predicted bush by three points and 35 electoral votes and he won by three votes and. i'm darn good. are you breaking these political odds down by county? >> i just look at people. i'm a people person. the same reason i've been predicting sporting event. i'm good at who has the edge based on situation historical or situational situations based on whether players are up or down. psychologically based on how they played last week and next week. i felt the same way about election. i know, four years ago i spoke to probably 1,000 i was a vice president nominee hundreds of small business people. i would say normally you think of sma
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 4:00pm EST
were running congress when we had a like nafta, china's most favorite nation status, the jvc, the world trade organization. all these trade deals people claim were going to bring jobs to the united states and in every case, the jobs left.
CSPAN
Dec 9, 2012 10:45pm EST
, geographies. somalia, china, mexico. in calista's case, her parents came, her grandparents came from switzerland and poland and in my case from places like scotland and ireland. you can learn to be an american. to do that, you have to learn to be an american. do you have an academic elites and news media elite who were opposed to teaching how to be an american company literally cut off the lifeblood of this country. so that's the basis of what we've been doing and that's why we have an american legacy to her. .. and sense i've written three novels on george washington, what a better pattern than to weave these giants, ronald reagan, after whom the soviet empire disappeared, and george washington after whom he can a country. what are the lessons of history? it will study the history because it is an interesting have it. i studied history to better understand present and the future so that i can be engaged in making history by being an intelligent person. that is what citizenship ought to be. and so what are some of the lessons klaxon not me start with the fiscal cliff i want to say so
CSPAN
Dec 15, 2012 10:00am EST
in china, a man without a country. so destitute that he made his way to shanghai in a mix of men and women's castoff clothing. in shanghai he obtained a passport, a document that the league of nations have begun to issue to stateless refugees, initially russian, in 1922, a first dip in the development of international refugee law and policy, the international office of refugees would when that 1938 peace prize. a year and to rally members of the non bolshevik russian diaspore and wasted they could do something akin to lembergs inspiring recent flight across the atlantic. in 1928 he decided it was up to him to do a proudly tatterdemalion, go round the world alone by bicycle. luckily did not have to do that and departed shanghai on a battered second-hand bicycle been upgraded to a new bicycle in bangkok in in a battered second-hand motorcycle in singapore. a benefactor gave him a brand new aerial motorcycle was a letter that guaranteed assistance. he think the worldwide services of the ymca, shell oil, and the firestone company and depended on the global availability of gasoline, oil, and fo
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